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Electro-L2

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General information

Electro-L №2, Russian _hydro-meteorological spacecraft, was launched on geostationary orbit from Tyuratam (Baikonur Cosmodrome), Kazakhstan. It is also known as GOMS 2, or Geostationary Operational Meteorological Satellite 2.

ElectroL2
Date of launch 2015.12.11 13:45:33 UTC
Getting to orbit 2015.12.11 22:43:26 UTC
General characteristics Orbit parameters
Total weight 1855 kg Apogee 35793.0 km
Launch vehicle Zenit-2 Perigee 35424.9 km
Launch type Ground Inclination 77,8o East longitude
Upper Stage Fregat-SB Power supply
Active life period 10 year Average daily power 100 W
Equipment characteristics
Weight 264 kg
Power consumption ≤ 55 W
Information traffic ≥ 500 Mb/day
The first Data 2016.01.21 09:30:00 UTC

Electro-L №2 will continue capture real-time images of clouds and storm systems, collecting weather imagery several times per hour with visible and infrared cameras. The satellite's position in geosynchronous orbit will yield views of the entire Earth disk, allowing its weather sensors to observe storm systems across a wide swath of Asia, the Middle East, and the Indian Ocean. The satellite will also study space weather phenomena and provide communications for search-and-rescue services.

SKL-E spectrometer has been installed on-board to register energetic particles originated from Earth's radiation belts or from Solar flares. Spectrometer is directed southward, perpendicular to satellite orbit plane. (more in English ... Russian...)

 

SKL-E spectrometer parameters and energy ranges of registered particles

Parameter energy ranges of registered particles
electrons protons
P1 170-300 keV > 1.2 MeV
P2 > 2.3 MeV >13,5 MeV
P3 2.3 – 4.2 MeV -
P4 4.2 – 6.0 MeV -
P5 6 – 20 MeV -
P6 - 13,5 – 23 MeV
P7 - 23 – 42 MeV
P8 - 42 – 112 MeV
P9 - 112 – 320 MeV
P10 >1.3 MeV 1.2 – 95 MeV
P11 - > 100 MeV

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